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4.23.17 CONCERT HONORS DR. DAVID WASSER

Posted by on Mar 5, 2017 in News, Uncategorized |

The Saratoga Chamber Players return to the United Methodist Church, Fifth Avenue & Henning Road on April 23 at 3PM with a program in honor of Dr. David Wasser who retired after almost 30 years of distinguished and varied service to all facets of the organization. As a long-time board member and volunteer as well as Board chair, David could be found housing musicians, making his special almond cookies for receptions and even moving chairs and music stands between pieces. The concert will feature the voice of soprano Charlotte Dobbs with songs by Schubert and Shostakovich’s “Seven Romances on Verses by Alexander Blok” for soprano, violin, cello and piano. The program also includes Schubert’s Piano Trio in B flat Major, op. 99 with SCP regulars, cellist Eliot Bailen and SCP Artistic Director/violinist Jill Levy, and with pianist Renana Gutman. Charlotte Dobbs was last heard with SCP several years ago. She has sung with the Philadelphia Orchestra, NY Philharmonic and the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra. Her opera engagements include the NY City Opera, and Chicago Opera Theater. Jill Levy is well known to area audiences in her role as concertmaster of the Albany Symphony Orchestra. Eliot Bailen is principal cello of the New York Chamber Ensemble and founder and Artistic Director of the Sherman Chamber Ensemble. New to SCP is Israeli pianist Renana Gutman. Ms. Gutman has performed as orchestral soloist with the Jerusalem and Haifa Symphonies, and has toured with Musicians from Marlboro. All four performers will greet attendees at a Meet-the-Musician reception following the concert. Tickets may be purchased on-line at http://www.saratogachamberplayers.org/event/voice-piano-strings-beckon/ or at the door. Adults: $20; Seniors: $18; Students: $15; Children are admitted free of charge. The concert is underwritten by a large group of friends and supporters of David Wasser and by a grant from the New York State Council on the Arts, a state...

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What’s Next

Posted by on May 20, 2015 in News, Uncategorized |

In recognition of the city’s centennial, Saratoga Chamber Players, bringing together musicians from Europe, Asia, Canada and the U.S. since 1987, presents “What’s Next”, a chamber concert with strings and bassoon to honor the traditions of the past and to look to the future. Under the Artistic Direction of Jill Levy, concertmaster of the Albany Symphony Orchestra, the concert on June 13 at 7:30 PM in North Creek at Tannery Pond will be repeated in Saratoga Springs on June 14 at 3:00 PM at the United Methodist Church, 5th Avenue & Henning Road. The program features 3 generations of a music-making family. Great-grandfather Adolf Busch, composer of String Quartet in One Movement, Op. 29, co-founded the Marlboro Music School and Festival with his son-in-law, Rudolf Serkin. His granddaughter, cellist Judith Serkin, and great-granddaughter, bassoonist Rose Vrbsky, will perform with violinists Jill Levy and Lucy Chapman and violist Kathy Andrew. Also on the program are works that reflect both past tradition and innovations that influence the future of music. Giacomo Puccini wrote I Crisantemi (Chrysanthemums), Elegy for String Quartet in memory of the recently deceased Duke Amadeo of Savoy. It is one of the few non-operatic works he wrote. Two of its melodic themes reappeared 2 years later in his opera of 1892, Manon Lescaut. This Elegy is rarely performed in its original form as a string quartet, most often played as an orchestral arrangement. François Devienne, overshadowed by his contemporaries Mozart and Haydn, wrote for wind instruments which his fellow composers rarely did. As a bassoonist for the Opéra de Paris and later flute teacher at the Paris Conservatoire, he composed scores of works for these instruments, among them the String Quartet in C Major, Op.73, no. 1. The success of his style led to his appellation as the “French Mozart.” Joseph Bodin de Boismortier became one of the most popular and prolific composers of the 18th century because, in a break with tradition and as a composer without a patron, he wrote to please his audiences in order to make a living. He became wealthy from publishing his own works and was one of the first to write a concerto for the bassoon using a new form developed in Italy, Sonata in D minor, Op. 14, no.3. Ludwig Beethoven’s String Quartet in F Major, Op. 135 is a distillation of his earlier works in form and style. It was the last complete piece Beethoven composed before his death a few months later in 1827. It is unlike his other late quartets in that it has many “teasing” moments with reminiscences of Haydn’s...

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“What’s Next”

Posted by on May 3, 2015 in Uncategorized |

In recognition of the city’s centennial, Saratoga Chamber Players, bringing together musicians from Europe, Asia, Canada and the U.S. since 1987, presents “What’s Next”, a chamber concert with strings and bassoon to honor the traditions of the past and to look to the future. Under the Artistic Direction of Jill Levy, concertmaster of the Albany Symphony Orchestra, the concert on June 13 at 7:30 PM in North Creek at Tannery Pond will be repeated in Saratoga Springs on June 14 at 3:00 PM at the United Methodist Church, 5th Avenue & Henning Road. The program features 3 generations of a music-making family. Great-grandfather Adolf Busch, composer of String Quartet in One Movement, Op. 29, co-founded the Marlboro Music School and Festival with his son-in-law, Rudolf Serkin. His granddaughter, cellist Judith Serkin, and great-granddaughter, bassoonist Rose Vrbsky, will perform with violinists Jill Levy and Lucy Chapman and violist Kathy Andrew. Also on the program are works that reflect both past tradition and innovations that influence the future of music. Giacomo Puccini wrote I Crisantemi (Chrysanthemums), Elegy for String Quartet in memory of the recently deceased Duke Amadeo of Savoy. It is one of the few non-operatic works he wrote. Two of its melodic themes reappeared 2 years later in his opera of 1892, Manon Lescaut. This Elegy is rarely performed in its original form as a string quartet, most often played as an orchestral arrangement. François Devienne, overshadowed by his contemporaries Mozart and Haydn, wrote for wind instruments which his fellow composers rarely did. As a bassoonist for the Opéra de Paris and later flute teacher at the Paris Conservatoire, he composed scores of works for these instruments, among them the String Quartet in C Major, Op.73, no. 1. The success of his style led to his appellation as the “French Mozart.” Joseph Bodin de Boismortier became one of the most popular and prolific composers of the 18th century because, in a break with tradition and as a composer without a patron, he wrote to please his audiences in order to make a living. He became wealthy from publishing his own works and was one of the first to write a concerto for the bassoon using a new form developed in Italy, Sonata in D minor, Op. 14, no.3. Ludwig Beethoven’s String Quartet in F Major, Op. 135 is a distillation of his earlier works in form and style. It was the last complete piece Beethoven composed before his death a few months later in 1827. It is unlike his other late quartets in that it has many “teasing” moments with reminiscences of Haydn’s...

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All-Bach Concert to Honor Musicians

Posted by on Feb 25, 2014 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

The Saratoga Chamber Players’ All-Bach concert concert on Easter afternoon, Sunday April 20, 3 PM, will honor the late Ruth and Lamar Alsop, Robert Conant and David Griggs-Janower. Their contributions to the musical world have enriched local audiences. Bach, like many composers, sometimes arranged his own music for different ensembles. It allowed him to change a piece to suit available instrumentalists or fit a new situation. These arrangements require a great deal of skill in orchestration, since what works on one instrument doesn’t necessarily work on another. Both pieces on this program are arrangements of earlier works. Bach’s Trio Sonata in G Major, BWV 1039 is arranged for violin, viola and continuo. The trio sonata is one of the chief forms of chamber music in the Baroque era. Trio indicates three components: 2 soloists and continuo (accompaniment). The second piece on the program is the Goldberg Variations, BWV 988 originally written for harpsichord and arranged by Dmitry Sitkovetsky in 1984 for string trio. First published in 1741, the Goldberg Variations consists of an aria and 30 variations. It is considered one of the most important examples of variation form. After the aria, every third variation in the series of 30 is a canon. The piece is named for Johann Gottlieb Goldberg who may have been the first performer. For this performance Jill Levy, SCP Artistic Director and violinist, will be joined by violist Dov Scheindlin and cellist Eric Bartlett. Levy, now in her 20th season with SCP is also concertmaster of the Albany Symphony Orchestra and a member of the Sherman Chamber Ensemble. Scheindlin is a member of the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, has soloed with the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra of Amsterdam and the Berlin Philharmonic and performed with the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center and the Met Chamber Ensemble. He has taught viola and chamber music at Harvard and Tanglewood. Bartlett served as principal cellist of the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra for 14 years and is now a member of the New York Philharmonic. He also served as principal cellist of Lincoln Center’s Mostly Mozart Festival. Bartlett teaches orchestral performance at Juilliard. The concert will be at the Saratoga United Methodist Church, 5th Avenue and Henning Road; Saratoga Springs. Tickets may be ordered on-line at www.saratogachamberplayers.org, or by calling 518.584.1427, or by purchase at the door on the afternoon of the concert. Adults: $18, seniors $15, students $12. Children accompanied by an adult are admitted...

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